PERIODONTOLOGY: GENTLE AND STATE-OF-THE-ART PERIODONTITIS THERAPY

Subspecialty: periodontology*:

Periodontitis (in the vernacular: periodontosis), also known as pyorrhea, is much more than just bleeding gums, inflamed gums (gingivitis) and gum recession (receding gums) with pocket formations. The main cause of periodontitis is dental plaque (tartar). This plaque consists of bacteria that lie on the gums, but especially under the gums. The plaque bacteria produce various harmful substances that lead to inflammation of the gums. The gums swell so much they begin to bleed and gum pockets form. (See photo, below right: 1) At this stage, if no professional treatment is provided, a further increase in the bacteria of the plaque in the gum pockets causes bone loss (See photo below right, 2 and photo below left: red line). Important: Periodontitis is not an illness of older patients. Most cases begin early, often completely painlessly, and frequently only become noticeably painful with age. In a TV report by RTL you can see Dr. Nicole Leick performing a treatment. Please refer also to the menu point Specialties 50Plus.

Through modern therapy concepts of periodontitis treatment (colloquially: gum treatment) with professional plaque and tartar removal, deep scaling and regular preventive dentistry, but also through surgical bone grafting or application of, for example, Emdogain or use of  a laser, the progression of periodontitis can be prevented. Dr. Nicole Leick is an active member of the German Society for Periodontology (DGP) and is a certified periodontologist with a subspecialty* in periodontology certified by the Hessen Dental Association (Landeszahnärztekammer Hessen) in Frankfurt. For over 9 years she has successfully treated periodontal diseases in patients in Frankfurt and Main-Taunus-Kreis (MTK), many of whom are referred to her by colleagues.

**certified and examined by the Hessen Dental Association (Landeszahnärztekammer Hessen) by qualification and verification of number of cases: periodontology cases > 4000, > 500 cases per year.

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